Name: [116] Erik Thompson
Member: 95 months
Authored: 44 videos
Description: Hi! I am currently a full time student at California State University Long Beach. I recently began to do research in molecular dynamics. I have interests in Python programming, physics, chemistry, and 3D simulation. Also I like bird watching! Here are some of photos I've taken: http://ww ...

VPython: Projectile Motion 1 [ID:079] (1/9)

in series: VPython - Physics and 3D in Python

video tutorial by Erik Thompson, added 03/07

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This is the first video in this tutorial series. It briefly discusses where to find information to install python and the VPython libraries. Then we create a 3D program demonstrating the effect of gravity on a dropped object.

These videos are aggregated with the kind permission of Erik Thompson.

Full source-code is in the wiki. Would you show your appreciation if you like this video? Just visit DZone.com and vote for this video - thanks.

Uploaded on 18th November 2006, running time 18 minutes.

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  • Video plays: 18682 (since July 30th)
  • Plays in last week: 28
  • Published: Sometime before 1st March 2007 (in other words - we don't remember!)

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All comments excluding tick-boxed quick-comments

This was a very interesting and informative video. What a fantastic way to use Python programming to demonstate the physics of gravity and motion!!!


63. Francis POIX Thu, 30 Sep 2010 03:04

Nice way to get started with Visual Python.

Thanks


62. Enrique Juan Thu, 09 Sep 2010 06:29

Really,Really thank for this comprehensive video for beginner,especially for poor student like me.


61. David Wiggins Thu, 02 Sep 2010 21:25

Good Intro.


60. Heng Ming Sat, 31 Jul 2010 07:23

Nice tutorial. Learn pretty much of the basic for Vpython just with first tutorial. Easy to understand. Thanks alot for your great effort !


Hey; great video! It helps me, a newbie programmer in Python, to start out! Thanks Erik!


very interesting for me. i have just started to look at Python so i am not sure want it can do


very long


Excellent video. I am a physics teacher and I plan to try to implement extra curricular activities involve programming (former programmer), and this tool/tutorial will be an excellent help for me to use with the kids.

Thanks!


good tutorial, I´m begining in this programmer and this is the first tutorial


54. sisir kr bose Thu, 29 Apr 2010 06:14

this type of tutorial is very much attracting


Thank you, nice video. I know now what else can be done with Python.


it help me a lot,thank you.


Not only did it help me learn how to begin using the vpython, but at the same time I learned the basics of simulation for physics, which was the whole reason I started python. Thank you.


Looking forward to learning more VPyhton. Thanks!


Very interesting introduction to VPython thankyou for taking the time to make this.

after a play i will be checking out the others.

cheers


Thank you Erik - very useful introduction


Just watched the first video on motion. It was helpful that you didn't do it perfectly the first time--for example, misspelling 'finished'. This shows the inevitable and important process of finding and correcting errors.

Overall, very clear. Some of your comments that are almost 'asides' to you are actually very important to us beginners. For example, that position is a vector with x, y, and z coordinates, and that the VPython uses the center of the ball as a reference point. You have a great talent for demonstrating and explaining--glad you're taking time from your other research to keep doing these videos.


46. anonymous Fri, 01 Jan 2010 12:53

Hi, I am a programmer myself but I have never programmed in Phyton before. This video was a great introduction of the visual capabilities. I can now program small animations for my nephew when he asks for my help in motion physics.

Thank you.


45. anonymous Sat, 26 Dec 2009 13:09

great stuff man


44. anonymous Wed, 23 Dec 2009 17:48

really clear and useful


43. anonymous Sat, 12 Dec 2009 21:05

sir,

Thank you very much


42. anonymous Tue, 17 Nov 2009 19:13

I loved it, but you are missing somthing very important: the Mass.

:)


41. anonymous Mon, 09 Nov 2009 19:07

Thanks! This gave me a great overview of VPython. It was very clear and concise.


40. anonymous Mon, 02 Nov 2009 12:55

Very clear and very interesting


39. anonymous Sun, 04 Oct 2009 20:22

Hi, I recently discovered python lenguage and it seems me so great, so I want to thank u for this tutorial. It will help to me.


38. anonymous Sun, 27 Sep 2009 00:16

nice. really interesting.

I've discovered something I did know nothing about.

gives me the idea to learn more about this.

thanks!


37. anonymous Sat, 05 Sep 2009 12:50

Hi Erik -

I'm a long time high school physics teacher, working this year on an independent study with a couple very bright kids. This tutorial was PERFECT for me...I hope it will be useful to them. Look forward to my homework "assignment".

Many thanks for your time and effort putting this online.

Mark


36. anonymous Tue, 01 Sep 2009 14:47

Wow that was really cool!! Coming from an animation programming back ground, this looks really easy to use!


35. anonymous Sat, 22 Aug 2009 19:51

A nice and useful intro to VPython. Thanks!


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