Name: [011] John Montgomery
Member: 104 months
Authored: 21 videos
Description: I'm a C/C++, Java and Python programmer living in Hove, UK. ...

The 'Hello World' Applet - Part 1 [ID:059] (1/10)

in series: Writing an Applet with Java

video tutorial by John Montgomery, added 03/07

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A demonstration of writing a very simple "hello world" applet in Java. In this ShowMeDo John demonstrates how to create a Java Applet and how to render a string of text within the applet.

Uploaded on 2nd September 2006, running time 3 minutes, file size 4mb.

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  • Published: Sometime before 1st March 2007 (in other words - we don't remember!)

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All comments excluding tick-boxed quick-comments

79. Charles Potter Fri, 15 Oct 2010 12:58

I would like to learn writing of Java applets/scripts. Something that explains each line of code and statement with examples. Where do I start?

I have a Fairchild Semiconductor application note with embedded Java applets and if I sent it to you, can you show me how to understand what is going on and how to modify the code for my own use?

The audio on your "Hello World" demo is too low at max volume.

Thanks

Charles Potter


Thanks very helpful!

Jake


77. hamdanov Mon, 09 Aug 2010 11:23

nice!!


Its about Okay


very nice video


very nice video


hello sir, i am very new to java applets,it is very nice to learn through your vedio tutorial.and thank you very much for providing this facility for me and many others.


72. Bruno Ribeiro Cabral Sun, 30 May 2010 12:27

simple but eficient!


Tutorial was good, but they are all basic.


Your voice was pretty quiet in this one, and the noise of your PC cooling itself was pretty overwhelming.

However, the video was very helpful. Thank you.


very quick, concise and informal, thanks.


very good movie


i'm trying Java for first time after using c c++ for a long time, every tutorial i have seen so far i just felt the tutors were making things harder than necessary. Thanks for simplifying it in one brief and concise video.


nice keep it up.


Hey dude,

Really enjoyed the first one I'm a c++ winforms dev and i'm having a go at applets in eclipse. the first vid was very good (i.e. quick and easy to understand)

thanks,

Phil


Very informative, I will be sure to watch the entire series. Have you ever dabbled in making java applet games? I would love to watch those tutorials as well


63. Élysson MR Sun, 28 Mar 2010 20:20

Good Screencast. Thanks


Hi, just I had a look at your video, first thanks a lot for doing this at all. I just bumped into this website after looking for info how to use 7 zip and was directly very quickly helped by a video how to do this. Since I just started a Java course and I am just about to do my first applet I thought I check what other videos that are available. Since I am a complete beginner to programming, I just made some minimal C programming as part of a mandatory IT intro course. For me your video was a bit to fast. That's my only comment. Best Regards Eva


Great examples, can your examples run in BetBeansIDE 6.8?


60. anonymous Wed, 06 Jan 2010 07:42

Thanks for the video!


59. anonymous Sun, 20 Dec 2009 09:31

cant understand


58. anonymous Sat, 07 Nov 2009 15:22

Very nice and concise, Thank you

My Vista PC Eclipse Java EE IDE for Web Developers.

Build id: 20090920-1017

behaves a little bit differently to your Mac


57. anonymous Wed, 28 Oct 2009 11:21

So good. Nice video.


56. anonymous Tue, 22 Sep 2009 04:11

no...........................link here...........................wat to do?


55. anonymous Thu, 17 Sep 2009 04:00

thank u so much.....................great job


54. anonymous Thu, 03 Sep 2009 12:55

This is cool, keep this up guys we do need this kind of resource.


53. anonymous Fri, 28 Aug 2009 20:34

good job, Thanks


52. anonymous Mon, 24 Aug 2009 03:25

Nice and helpful video.

Thanks.


50. anonymous Sun, 16 Aug 2009 11:23

OK


49. anonymous Sat, 15 Aug 2009 08:06

You did not show how to do it from start. Applet project was already created when video started. For me as a total novice that is as important as the part you showed in the video.


48. anonymous Wed, 29 Jul 2009 09:05

good one.


47. anonymous Wed, 29 Jul 2009 05:43

great!!!


46. anonymous Sat, 25 Jul 2009 15:44

Good job


45. anonymous Fri, 24 Jul 2009 13:57

Keep up the good work


44. anonymous Fri, 24 Jul 2009 12:32

Curious why you chose an applet over an application?

Also, what level is this intended for, you leave a lot of questions like, how do you know where things go and what are these things you are using and how does the program know what they do.

otherwise a fine job!


43. anonymous Thu, 23 Jul 2009 05:56

Good!!!


42. anonymous Tue, 21 Jul 2009 00:14

this is a good site to build my basic knowledge of java and with the help of videos tutorials this helps me a lot to know the many things in a very limited time.........

thanx for videos on this sie...


41. anonymous Thu, 09 Jul 2009 00:50

good video


40. anonymous Wed, 08 Jul 2009 18:24

Interesting, could I approach you guys for advice? I am a web programmer hobbist and i have learned the basics in HTML CSS JavaScript PHP and MySQL. I find could use some good info on java applets.


39. anonymous Tue, 07 Jul 2009 01:42

that great!Thanks !


38. anonymous Wed, 17 Jun 2009 13:17

good video


37. anonymous Wed, 17 Jun 2009 05:16

good


36. anonymous Sun, 14 Jun 2009 15:18

good for learning


35. anonymous Thu, 11 Jun 2009 08:45

easy and understandable


THESE ARE VERY GOOD TUTES TO BEGIN


THESE ARE VERY GOOD TUTES TO BEGIN


32. anonymous Tue, 09 Jun 2009 04:32

good tutorial


31. anonymous Sun, 07 Jun 2009 07:57

for learning base applet is good


30. anonymous Sat, 30 May 2009 10:58

good


29. anonymous Tue, 12 May 2009 17:27

LIke your videos, very helpful. What are you using to record the screens?


28. anonymous Fri, 01 May 2009 04:32

Such Videos are really helpful and easy to learn. However as these videos are a part of interactive learning, i would request you to please use a good mic so that your voice is audible.

Thanks for a helpful tutorial.


25. anonymous Mon, 30 Mar 2009 22:46

I'm a C# developer checking out Eclipse and Java, and you helped me jump start my familiarity with Eclipse and Java. Thanks. You did go fast though, but thankfully there's a pause button, so no complaints there! Thanks for taking the time...


I was copying some code from a Java game programming book into Eclipse, and I think your video will make it easier for me! :)


Suggestions would be intro to java as well on this site.


21. anonymous Fri, 01 Aug 2008 10:55

thanks for a video on basic applet in eclipse. excellent for a jump start into the subject. Much better than reading up a book.


20. anonymous Mon, 02 Jun 2008 13:00

Thank You, got my first Applet up and running thanks to this video. I had the same problem as above people have mentioned. If you go into the bin directory then you will have an HTML file named index there, open that and all will be good. I presume it splits your actual code and your executable files so you don't screw them up! Thanks again


Hi Anonymous,

I think the problem might be that Eclipse by default (at least in recent versions) sets up a src/ and bin/ directory to contain the source code and the class files. I'm guessing that the class file is in bin/ rather than in the same directory as index.html (as shown in my video).

So the easiest thing may be to try changing the codebase of the applet tag to be bin/ e.g.:

<applet code="TestApplet.class" codebase="bin/" width="256" height="256">

</applet>

That way the browse should look inside the bin/ directory to find the applet.

Hope that helps,

cheers,

John


18. anonymous Sat, 08 Dec 2007 15:15

Following your instructions, I hit a little snag - my .html file doesn't work!

I typed in word-for-word everything you said in the .html file and the java file, and when I go to Run As - Java Applet, it works fine

However, when I open index.html like you did, it tells me that the java file failed to be loaded

I am using a PC, but I tried opening it in FireFox and Internet Explorer, neither worked. And yes, I enabled Java and told it not to block it lol

I am very new to this and hoped that the Hello World applet would be very easy...but it seems not to be for me...anyway, I have Eclipse and therefore did literally everything you did...I haven't changed any of the defualts though, should I ahve? Please email me if you know something i dont about what I did wrong


17. anonymous Sat, 08 Dec 2007 15:13

Following your instructions, I hit a little snag - my .html file doesn't work!

I typed in word-for-word everything you said in the .html file and the java file, and when I go to Run As - Java Applet, it works fine

However, when I open index.html like you did, it tells me that the java file failed to be loaded

I am using a PC, but I tried opening it in FireFox and Internet Explorer, neither worked. And yes, I enabled Java and told it not to block it lol

I am very new to this and hoped that the Hello World applet would be very easy...but it seems not to be for me...anyway, I have Eclipse and therefore did literally everything you did...I haven't changed any of the defualts though, should I ahve? Please email me if you know something i dont about what I did wrong

I opened the Java Console, here's the error that I got:

Java Plug-in 1.6.0_02

Using JRE version 1.6.0_02 Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM

User home directory = C:\Documents and Settings\Jake

----------------------------------------------------

c: clear console window

f: finalize objects on finalization queue

g: garbage collect

h: display this help message

l: dump classloader list

m: print memory usage

o: trigger logging

p: reload proxy configuration

q: hide console

r: reload policy configuration

s: dump system and deployment properties

t: dump thread list

v: dump thread stack

x: clear classloader cache

0-5: set trace level to <n>

----------------------------------------------------

load: class TestApplet not found.

java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: TestApplet

at sun.applet.AppletClassLoader.findClass(Unknown Source)

at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(Unknown Source)

at sun.applet.AppletClassLoader.loadClass(Unknown Source)

at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(Unknown Source)

at sun.applet.AppletClassLoader.loadCode(Unknown Source)

at sun.applet.AppletPanel.createApplet(Unknown Source)

at sun.plugin.AppletViewer.createApplet(Unknown Source)

at sun.applet.AppletPanel.runLoader(Unknown Source)

at sun.applet.AppletPanel.run(Unknown Source)

at java.lang.Thread.run(Unknown Source)

Caused by: java.io.FileNotFoundException: C:\Documents and Settings\Jake\Desktop\Work\Javascript\TestApplet\TestApplet.class (The system cannot find the file specified)

at java.io.FileInputStream.open(Native Method)

at java.io.FileInputStream.<init>(Unknown Source)

at java.io.FileInputStream.<init>(Unknown Source)

at sun.net.www.protocol.file.FileURLConnection.connect(Unknown Source)

at sun.net.www.protocol.file.FileURLConnection.getInputStream(Unknown Source)

at sun.applet.AppletClassLoader.getBytes(Unknown Source)

at sun.applet.AppletClassLoader.access$100(Unknown Source)

at sun.applet.AppletClassLoader$1.run(Unknown Source)

at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)

... 10 more


16. anonymous Sat, 08 Dec 2007 15:00

I have a slight problem - I typed in exactly what you did, and did move-for-move everything you did.

When I go to Run as - Java Applet, it works fine

However, when I try to open the .HTML file, it says that the java applet failed to load

Note - I am using a PC, but I tried opening it in FireFox and Internet Explorer and neither worked


Moses, if you watch this series it should show you how to embed an applet into a webpage.

Sun has plenty of documentation on this:

http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/deployment/applet/html.html


I'd suggest you look at the java api documentation ( http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/ ) and look at the class java.lang.String to see which method you should use.


13. anonymous Mon, 03 Dec 2007 05:55

Hi John please help me solve this problem!

what method would you use to find out the position of letter "V" in the string 5 containing "java"? (3mks)

please solve it as fast as possible


12. anonymous Mon, 03 Dec 2007 05:48

can you please help me write this program?

write an applet that displays a student name and registration number, and show how you would embed this applet in a web page.

your sincerly

Moses Balah

from KENYA


Audio/voice is OK, explanation is clear, it is obviously not a tutorial, that is why the title does not contain the 'tutorial' word.

Cheers.


Great video, i have looked for a clear way of doing Applet with Eclipse, and now a know, tanks.

(about the audio it is okej, i use headphone, becurse speaker sound on at least laptops is not great with speakers.

About the speed in the video, as in all video you can always pause the video, i do when i like to write somting down.)


9. anonymous Tue, 17 Jul 2007 18:17

I enjoyed this video. I am a computer science (Java) teacher and would use it for review purposes for students - especially those interested in learning Eclipse.


Hi Anon,

again sorry to hear you feel this way. I think the "emotional" response was more to do with your tone - rather than what you were saying. The way you phrased things sounded like you were attacking rather than just suggesting. I gather this was not your intent. I guess this is one of the problems with communicating via the internet.

Perhaps though these videos should be labelled as being an "introduction" rather than "tutorial", so that people's expectations would match the actual content? This series was not meant to be a full tutorial, but perhaps I have been too brief in some of my descriptions of what I have been doing.

Anyway, thank you for the feedback. I shall bear it in mind for any future videos I produce.

cheers,

John


7. anonymous Mon, 28 May 2007 13:37

I see: pointing what is not good is interpreted as an outrageous attack, hence the need of having so much defensive replies.

It's a pity.

I have pointed concrete issues with the most concrete goal of helping to improve the video series, not with the intent of attacking the author. It doesn't help being so protective with him. Quite on the contrary, I would say if it was me.

My frustration on this series is precisely because I thought I was going to learn something, and for the reasons I mentioned, I did not. It is not a language barrier. I was specific, and no specific comments were given. Only emotional ones.

I am not qualified to make a tutorial on Java, this is why I came here in the first place. Otherwise, I would be very happy in contributing in this matter. I might do, in other subjects, with pleasure. I would also be happy to learn from the critics of my eventual public as long as they are objective (but not rude, of course).

The replies above show good friendship for a fellow collaborator, which is fine, but don't help him at all in improving his work in this site. What a pity, because it is clear that the author master the subject. Without being so protective to him (wrong use of friendship), the whole community could really benefit of a better work. The fact that it is given for free, doesn't mean that it is not subject to be improved. Look at Open Source. If bugs and mistakes were not highlighted, Open Source was a failure. It is not.

Anybody willing to collaborate to the community, must be open enough to improve his work.

It is just sad that there is such amount of protection around a work that is clearly needing improvement in so many areas, despite the fact that it seems to satisfy a group of 'friends'.

Unfortunately, the closest thing to a real friend's comment in this whole series, are my comments.


Sorry for the double-post.

Horst, the sourcecode is in the SMD-Wiki:

http://wiki.showmedo.com/index.php/JavaMontgomeryAppletSeries#Code_for_hello_world_applet


-------------

This "Hello World" video is anything but a tutorial. The author is just doing something, very fast and mumbling some words.

-------------

I think, you didn't listen to what John said in the beginning: 'A very simple Java applet', he didn't say 'A Java tutorial'.

-------------

Not only the voice needs to be clear and loud, but also the contents of what is said must be meaningful, and not just "now let me click here, then we open there and click ok". That teaches nothing.

-------------

The voice is clear enough, I had no problems understanding this(and I am a non-native English-speaker). And John explains, what he does. Or tell us, where didn't. And he's also not just showing, how fast he can do some things. If would be like that, you would find it on Youtube and not on ShowMeDo.

At last, did you see any better screencast about making a simple Java applet?


Hello John,

nice video. I could understand the audio without problems (i always use headphones).

Very cool to see the Mac User-Interface in action.

I think you did a good job on showing how easy it is to use Eclipse and Java and you took away much of my "fear of the unknow".

Small suggestion:

Is it possible to publish the "hello world" sourcecode that you wrote in the video on a (wiki) page for download ? I always find it hard to reproduce the cool things i see on the videos when i can't copy &amp; paste the sourcecode.


anon - I am a bit worried that you miss the point of our ShowMeDo site. Volunteers freely give their time to make useful videos which show us all (for free) how to learn new skills. Reading a written-description is hard-work and difficult to visualise, but videos make it *must* easier to understand a new process.

John has made an excellent series here - language barriers will always exist but I think you are being perhaps overly-critical by saying that John mumbles and talks too fast. I learned from John's videos as have many others - I don't know too much Java, I had never written an applet, and I didn't know much about Eclipse when I first saw his videos - and I learned new skills.

Perhaps I can pass the ball back to you? Would you be interested in constructing a short Java Introduction series? I'd be happy to assist and you'd get to join our 38 other great authors in sharing your knowledge with a growing body of users around the world. We have served over 250,000 copies of our tutorials since we started and we add new videos all the time.

We could certainly do with new Java content - the bulk of our videos are for Python but Java has a much larger installed user-base...some more videos would be welcomed by everyone here.

It would be great if you wanted to join us and share your knowledge, to teach more people more skills.

Regards,

Ian (co-founder)


Sorry to hear you feel that way and I apologise if you found my voice difficult to understand.

My intent with this video was not a full blown tutorial on writing Java Applets. There are plenty of written tutorials that cover that. Instead I was literally attempting to _show_ how one would write a HelloWorld applet. In is much more in the spirit of the (for example) "Creating a weblog in 15 minutes" Ruby on Rails screencast. The main objective being to let the viewer get an idea of what is needed/what can be done in a visual fashion.

John


I am sorry but I can't give a positive grade to this video. I just want to point what I find wrong, and this is how I want to encourage the author to improve the work, rather than say it is wonderful and not being honest.

This "Hello World" video is anything but a tutorial. The author is just doing something, very fast and mumbling some words (difficult to get) that only describe what the mouse pointer is doing, but does not "explain" anything at all. I am very disappointed.

Not only the voice needs to be clear and loud, but also the contents of what is said must be meaningful, and not just "now let me click here, then we open there and click ok". That teaches nothing.

What is the goal of this video, anyhow: to show how fast the author handles the interface of Eclipse? Then well done. If not, then please review techniques of how to teach something, and please first set clear objectives for the viewers, beyond "see how fast I move my way through this program". I look forward for the next version.


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